How to Use Your Artist’s Statement


Your Artist's Statement


Once you have an artist’s statement that works for you how can you make use of it? Here are a few suggestions:


1.  Use it to create your Unique Selling Proposition (USP). Your artist’s statement should talk about your inspiration and what is unique about your work, and help tell your story. This is a perfect beginning to honing down your statement into a sentence or two or which describes why people will love to collect your work. Your USP in turn is the basis for your marketing, and how you will reach out to your audience with a consistent and compelling message.

2.  A well-written artist’s statement should fit perfectly into your website, either on the Home or About page. When it is straightforward and creates an emotional resonance with the reader, it will draw them in and make people want to know more about you, and your art.

3.  Your artist’s statement is often required on applications – for grants, residencies, and the like. Here is where all that time carefully crafting your statement can pay off, especially when it shows that you have real clarity in your vision, your technique and your message.

4.  When you are called on to speak about your work (such as at a gallery opening, artist appearance or even at a show) use your artist’s statement as the basis for your talk. The same resonance that you create when writing your statement will translate, and you will be in a position to have a conversation or Q&A with your audience. Knowing your artist’s statement well will help keep you on track and confident when speaking.

5.  When you write about your work, for an article, or even for your blog, use the message you created in your artist’s statement , and expand upon it. This will give you an opportunity to really share your story, which is a huge factor in developing a collector base for your work.


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  1. Your artist’s statement comes from your heart and so does your art so it is the basis of everything. If you can articulate it, since sometimes the art is visualization and not verbal communication. But in the artist’s statement, you do have to find a way to say what you are doing in words. But I agree, there will be resonance when you speak from your place of truth and meaning.

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