Artist Profile: Nadia Fairlamb

Hawaii-based artist Nadia Fairlamb, owner of The Mermaid’s Mirror, presents her handmade collection andĀ speaks about her creative business.

 

Wave Mandala Mirror by Nadia Fairlamb. See her artist profile at www.ArtsBusinessInstitute.org

 

What in your background has influenced your current body of work?

I grew up in a military family so I spent my childhood in Europe and Australia. I was enamored with the decorative arts found all over Europe. When I earned my BFA in Sculptural Ceramics from Stephen F. Austin State University in Texas, I also minored in Archaeology and Botany. Because of my love for anthropology and archaeology and art, I got jobs working as a technical illustrator of archaeological artifacts during and after college. Several years after college, I owned a bakery where I learned essential skills necessary to run a high-volume production facility. During that time, I also trained to become dance and yoga teacher.

 

Artist Nadia Fairlamb with work in progress. See her artist profile at www.ArtsBusinessInstitute.org

 

My work is influenced by all of that. I make functional and decorative mirrors, many of them with plays on blending universal symbols that are about the inherent connection of all things, which I experience regularly in meditation and dance.

 

Turquoise Dream Mirror by Nadia Fairlamb. See her artist profile at www.ArtsBusinessInstitute.org

 

Tell us about your technique and what makes it unusual.

I use a jigsaw to cut the images from the wood I work with. I aim to use my jigsaw like others would use a pencil or paintbrush to creates lines and shapes. Like some kinds of calligraphy, even Zen calligraphy, in which a single line or stroke is used to create a work or shape or symbol, I use my jigsaw to cut a shape with as little repletion as possible.

 

Nadia Fairlamb at work on a wooden mirror. See her artist profile at www.ArtsBusinessInstitute.org

 

How have you sold your work so far, and what are your plans for the future?

I began selling my work in Hawaii at local farmers markets. After a few years of developing my style, I found out about larger art sales events from friends and other crafters. After a few years of improving my craft and technique, I started selling at the larger art fairs and juried shows and then created a website.

 

A Moment in Paradise Mirror by Nadia Fairlamb. See her artist profile at www.ArtsBusinessInstitute.org

 

After another few years of further improvement and online business/art courses to improve my sales and marketing skills, I got invited to sell at some local stores and galleries, and then my art became a full-time job. Six years later, I now sell several pieces a year at a local gallery, am carried by Nordstrom, and over half of my income comes from custom/commissioned projects.

 

Wave Mandala 2 Mirror by Nadia Fairlamb. See her artist profile at www.ArtsBusinessInstitute.org

 

At the beginning of 2017, I became one of 20 recipients of the Clark Hulings Business Accelerator Program for emerging artists. Right now, I am creating a new website with better sales features, have approached a new local gallery, am researching new ways to wholesale and retail my work, and I have bi-annual art openings at my studio gallery. I am working on improving my style and technique more now so that I can work directly with art collectors, art consultants, and interior designers. I also have plans to show my work on the mainland and get gallery representation on the west coast.

 

 

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • LinkedIn
  • Posterous
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter

Speak Your Mind

*

*